Japanese Courses Fall 2019

Japanese 001. Elementary Japanese (5 units)

Section Instructor CRN
001 Junko Ito 47943
002 Junko Ito 47944
003 Junko Ito 47945
004 Moeko Watanabe 47946
005 Moeko Watanabe 47947
006 Miyo Uchida 47948
007 Miyo Uchida 47949
008 Yumiko Shibata 47950
009 Yumiko Shibata 47951
010 Staff 47952
011 Staff 47953
012 Staff  
013 Miki Wheeler 47955
014 Staff 47956
015 Staff 63559
016 Staff 63561

Course Description: An introduction to spoken and written Japanese in cultural contexts, with emphasis on communication.  (Students who have successfully completed Japanese 002 or 003 in the 10th or higher grade in high school may receive unit credit for this course on a P/NP grading basis only.)

Prerequisite: None.

GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, Oral Literacy and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture/Discussion - 5 hours.

Textbooks:

  • Eri Banno, et al., Genki I: An Integrated Course in Elementary Japanese [2nd Edition]  (Japan Times/Tsai Fong Books, 2011)
  • Eri Banno, Genki I: An Integrated Course in Elementary Japanese Workbook [2nd Edition]  (Japan Times/Tsai Fong Books, 2011)

Japanese 004. Intermediate Japanese (5 units)

Section Instructor CRN
001 Kazuhide Takeuchi 47957
002 Yoko Kato 47958
003 Yoko Kato 47959
004 Yoko Kato 47960
005 Miyo Uchida 47961

Course Description: Intermediate-level communication skills in spoken and written Japanese in cultural context, based on language skills developed in Japanese 003.

Prerequisite: Japanese 003 or Language Placement Exam.

GE credit (New): Arts and Humanities, Oral Literacy and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture/Discussion - 5 hours.

Textbooks:

  • Eri Banno, et al., Genki II: An Integrated Course in Elementary Japanese [2nd Edition]  (Japan Times/Tsai Fong Books, 2011)
  • Eri Banno, et al., Genki II: An Integrated Course in Elementary Japanese Workbook [2nd Edition]  (Japan Times/Tsai Fong Books, 2011)

Japanese 010. Masterworks of Japanese Literature (4 units)       [Taught in English]

Joseph Sorensen


CRN 47962

Course Description: This course serves as an introduction, in English, to selected masterworks of Japanese literature from the 7th century into the 21st. We will read from a wide variety of genres: poetry (both ancient and modern), myths, tales, novels, plays, and short stories. The course is organized chronologically around a central theme: depictions of love in literature. We will consider the historical and cultural context of each work, as well as the conventions of the various genres we encounter in our readings. Among the questions to be considered throughout the course are: What kinds of love and what aspects of love are depicted in literature? How are they represented? What is not represented? What does it mean to be a “masterpiece” of literature? This course has no prerequisites, and there is no assumption of prior knowledge of Japanese language, history, or culture. Students' grades based on quizzes, in-class discussion, term paper, midterm and final exams.

Prerequisite: None.

GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • TBA

Japanese 101. Japanese Literature in Translation: The Early Period (4 units)       [Taught in English]

Staff


CRN 47987

Course description: Study of early Japanese literature from the Nara to the end of the Heian period through a broad survey of the major literary genres such as lyric poetry, court diaries, prose narratives, poem-tales, and classical Chinese writings.

Prerequisite: None.

GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • TBA

Japanese 111. Modern Japanese: Reading and Discussion (4 units)

Section Instructor CRN
001 Kazuhide Takeuchi 47887
002 Moeko Watanabe 47888
003 Yumiko Shibata 47889

Course Description: JPN 111 is the second in the sequence of third-year Japanese courses at UCD (equivalent to the former JPN 112).  In JPN 111, students learn to present information and opinions in logically connected, coherent, and culturally appropriate ways. They also learn to read and to write for various purposes and audiences.  Students do extensive reading about Japanese culture and learn to think and speak critically about this information.  The topics of readings include Japanese culinary culture, religions, pop culture and traditional theatrical arts.  Written styles needed for different purposes and audiences are also studied and practiced.  Students are expected to retain 504 kanji by the end of JPN 006 and learn an additional 210 new kanji in JPN 111.

Prerequisite: Successful completion (C- or better) of Japanese 006 or the equivalent language proficiency.

GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, Oral Literacy and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • Oka Mayumi, Tobira: Power Up Your Kanji  (Kuroshio Publishers, 2010)
  • Oka Mayumi, Tobira: Gateway to Advanced Japanese Learning through Content and Multimedia  (Kuroshio Publishers, 2010)
  • Jack Halpern, The Kodansha Kanji Learner's Dictionary: Revised and Expanded  (Kodansha USA, 2013)

Japanese 121. Advanced Japanese I (4 units)

Nobuko Koyama


CRN 47992

Course Description: This course is the first of three courses in a series of 4th year Advanced Japanese which focuses on the levels of formality or politeness in conversation as well as socio-cultural aspects and topics in the Japanese society. The first of three courses will have a special focus on everyday genres of readings and writings.

The course is designed to accomplish five major objectives. First, it will help students develop a higher level of reading and writing skills as they familiarize with socio-cultural topics. Second, it will help students improve their levels of formality in speaking in different situations, both public and non-public. Third, it will also help students develop critical thinking and manners for discussion in Japanese. Fourth, it will help students learn idiomatic expressions and more complex syntactic forms. Lastly, it will help students acquire overall proficiency equivalent to N2 of Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT). 

To achieve these goals, the course will provide students with the readings from a variety of genres and require them to write from a short prose to an essay. Based on their reading and writing, students will be engaged in round-table discussions and make oral presentations.

Prerequisite: Japanese 113 or consent of instructor (nkoyama@ucdavis.edu).

GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, Oral Literacy, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • All readings provided online.

Japanese 134. Readings in the Humanities: Traditional Culture (4 units)

Joseph Sorensen


CRN 63085

Course description: In this course we will read very short articles in Japanese, usually two pages in length, on a variety of topics related to traditional Japanese culture.  Keeping in mind the constructed nature of “traditional culture,” we will discuss (in Japanese to the extent possible) the elements that comprise our notions of traditional Japan.  Topics range from calligraphy, gardening, and traditional music, to paper-making, woodblock prints, and temple and shrine architecture.  Subject matter will in part be determined by the interests of the students.  The goal of the course is to train students to read non-fiction materials critically, as well as for basic information, and to use a variety of dictionaries proficiently in order to produce acceptable English translations.  The course also serves to expose students to a wide range of traditional Japanese arts.  As a fourth-year reading course, students are expected to have completed third-year Japanese at UC Davis or achieved a similar level at a comparable institution.  Students who have not completed JPN 113 at UC Davis should consult with the instructor (jsorensen@ucdavis.edu).

Prerequisite: Japanese 113; or equivalent language proficiency, or consent of instructor (jsorensen@ucdavis.edu).

GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Discussion - 1 hour; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • A Course Reader

Japanese 153. Love, Sexuality and the Family in Modern Japanese Literature (4 units)       [Taught in English]

Michiko Suzuki


CRN 63086

Course Description: Love and sexuality in their various forms have been a central topic for exploration by writers of modern and contemporary Japanese literature from the late 19th century to the present. While such concepts are universal human experiences, they are also rooted in specific historical and cultural contexts. The family as a social, cultural and legal institution profoundly informs literary examinations of love and sexuality, including issues of normativity and deviance, love within and outside of family ties, different forms of marriage/divorce, gender roles, and the struggle between the family and the individual.

By examining texts written over a one hundred-year period, we will gain a deeper understanding of literary narratives through their engagement with the evolving institution of family and with changing ideas of love and sexuality. We will focus mainly on novels and short stories, but also read several secondary articles in literary criticism, history, religion, and sociology.

Class will combine lecture and discussion. Lectures, readings and discussions are in English. No previous knowledge of Japanese language or culture is required.

Prerequisite: None.

GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • Junichiro Tanizaki, Naomi  (Vintage Books, 2001)
  • Junichiro Tanizaki, The Key & The Diary of a Mad Old Man, translated by Howard Hibbett  (Vintage Books, 2004)
  • Banana Yoshimoto, Kitchen, translated by Megan Backus  (Grove Press, 2006)